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Truck of Seine River

Resolute Forest Products recognizes and respects the cultural and social significance of the land, water and forests of Canada to its First Nations peoples. We also understand these resources are critical to their prosperity and economic sustainability. We share a common interest in ensuring that the forests we rely on continue to provide for the environmental, social, cultural and economic needs of future generations. Through decades of working alongside these partners, we know that conversations about the future of the boreal forest must include the voices of the First Nations people. That’s why we have called for their active participation in the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement. (Learn more about CBFA here).

Instrumental in Sustainable Forest Management

Given our belief that public consultation is an essential step in the sustainable forestry process, we make sure we engage our First Nations partners in reviewing our harvesting plans to ensure we’ve taken into account all local environmental, social, cultural, traditional and economic considerations. Resolute enjoys strong partnerships with many such communities:

Ontario, Canada

  • THUNDER BAY, ON: On May 14, 2013, Resolute celebrated the 10th anniversary of its Thunder Bay sawmill; a unique business partnership between Resolute and the Fort William First Nation. The mill employs over 170 people. In 2012, the Thunder Bay sawmill also became the first facility in Canada to operate under regulations created by the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act. This legislation enables Federal Reserve land to operate under Provincial statutes, thereby facilitating industrial development with First Nations on their land. The project’s ongoing success is the result of the collective efforts over the past 10 years of the Company and the Fort William First Nation, the sawmill employees, the City of Thunder Bay, the governments of Ontario and Canada, and the many contractors and suppliers that service the facility.
  • ATIKOKAN, ON: Our new $50 million sawmill project at Atikokan will create around 90 jobs, with additional jobs in construction and hauling lumber and residual wood chips. The company recently signed a memorandum of agreement with First Nations in the Atikokan area, which is expected to generate significant economic opportunity for Aboriginal communities in the region.
  • WABIGOON LAKE, ON: Resolute assisted the Wabigoon Lake Ojibway Nation in establishing a tree nursery in their community. The Company also purchases more than 1.5 million trees annually from this venture to support regeneration activities.
  • IROQUOIS FALLS, ON: Three Nations Logging, a forestry contracting company owned by Moose Band Development Corporation (Moose Cree First Nation), carries out all direct harvesting work on behalf of Resolute on the company’s Iroquois Falls licence areas.
  • Resolute also has a number of partnerships with other First Nations groups in Ontario related to employment and contracting opportunities, wood purchase, harvest planning, road construction, maintenance reforestation, and sharing of expertise in sustainable forest management certification.

Quebec, Canada

  • OBEDJIWAN, QC: This joint venture operation with the Atikamekw Council of Obedjiwan has been in place since 1998. The Council owns 55% of the Opitciwan sawmill, while Resolute owns 45%. The sawmill is located on reserve land and currently employs around 80 members of the community of Obedjiwan. Those employed by the venture act as role models for the youth in this northern community. Resolute has contributed to the maintenance of road access to the community, supported infrastructure, and assisted in the implementation of the sawmill forestry service, and entered into wood purchase agreements with the community. In September 2013, the Opitciwan sawmill was awarded the prestigious Aboriginal Business Leadership Award by the Forest Products Association of Canada and the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business.
  • MANIWAKI, QC: Resolute has had a partnership with the community of Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg for the last ten years, in which Resolute has carried out forest management and harvesting activities in exchange for a stumpage fee for volumes allocated to Kitigan Zibi by the Quebec government.
  • Resolute has a number of partnerships with other First Nations groups in Quebec related to employment and contracting opportunities, wood purchase, harvest planning, facilitation of negotiations, Innu language translation, mapping of cultural landmarks, development of an adapted forestry practice code, and sharing of expertise in sustainable forest management certification.

These Partnerships Matter

Through mutually beneficial employment and business development opportunities, Resolute can support economic and social empowerment of our partner communities.

  • There are 800 First Nations communities in the boreal forest region of Canada. In some of our operating communities, they make up a large portion of the population. Strong relations are a must for any company with operations in the region.
  • Approximately 17,000 First Nations people work in Canada’s forest products sector. Ensuring that we understand the needs of their communities is good for forest products companies as a whole because all of these people are valued as colleagues and team members.

 

 

Related article: Northwestern Ontario First Nations see $100 million in new aboriginal business

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Boreal Forest

Addressing the conservation of woodland caribou in Canada: A work in progress
Woodland caribou is an emblematic species of the boreal forest. It is such a national symbol in Canada that it is featured on the 25 cents piece and has been for decades. Due to the observed decline of populations of woodland caribou over several years of monitoring in several regions in Canada, the species was added to the Canadian government’s list of threatened species in 2002 . Since that time, the country’s provinces, First Nations, communities and the forest products industry have collaborated to take action for the long-term recovery and survival of this noble creature.

Three quarters of the caribou’s territory has already been safeguarded

  • In Quebec, 76 percent of the caribou’s range is off limits to harvesting
  • In Ontario, 77 percent of the caribou’s range is off limits to harvesting

Caribou, Predators and Habitat Change
Caribou protect themselves from predators, such as wolves, coyotes and bears, by spreading out over large areas of land. While you might find two to three moose per square kilometer (250 acres) in the boreal, you’ll generally find just one to two caribou per tract of 100 square kilometers (25,000 acres).

This strategy of spreading the population over vast regions makes it much less likely that a caribou will encounter a predator, which allows the species to grow and propagate without having to constantly be on the lookout to avoid or escape being hunted. In many cases, caribou fall victim to wolves, coyotes and bears who are actually hunting for bigger game, like moose. Woodland caribou, unlike their tundra dwelling relatives, don’t assemble in large herds that make it easy for wolves to hunt. In addition, because of their smaller size, compared to moose, they don’t offer as much of a meal when they do happen to be caught.

When tracts of forest are harvested, low vegetation, herbs and new trees quickly colonize the fertile and newly open area. This type of ground cover provides a rich and abundant source of forage, which attracts several herbivores species, such as moose. As a consequence of the influx of moose, wolves, coyotes and bears also find their way to the area in order to hunt. As the number of predators increases, the likelihood of one of them running into a caribou also goes up, which eventually leads to reduced caribou populations.

Resolute protects land to increase caribou habitat
In order to ensure that caribou habitat remains safe and abundant well into the future, Resolute is promoting forest management practices that target large tracts of land while leaving sufficient forested areas to meet the caribou’s habitat requirements. The areas identified for caribou conservation must be large enough to allow caribou to rely on their dispersion strategy to reduce encounters with predators. In addition to this approach, we have also supported several initiatives to set aside additional territory, some of which are currently under discussion as part of the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement (CBFA).

Up to now, Resolute has made the following contributions in land toward the conservation of woodland caribou habitat:

  • In Northeastern Ontario, the Company, along with CBFA partners, supports a proposal for an additional caribou conservation area covering almost 8,348 square kilometres on the Abitibi River Forest (3,223 square miles).
  • In Northwestern Ontario, predecessor companies of Resolute Forest Products contributed some of their tenure lands for the creation of Wabakimi Provincial Park, which covers an area of 8,920 square kilometers, and is one of the largest parks in the province.
  • In Quebec, Resolute was among the first companies to propose and implement an action plan for caribou. The Company also contributed to the government process to identify protected areas suitable for caribou protection.


Safeguarding caribou with sound management
With over 75% of the caribou range located north of the managed forest, we rely on numerous strategies, best practices and guidelines developed specifically for caribou conservation to provide suitable habitat for woodland caribou within the 25% of the range that falls in the managed forest. Ontario’s Caribou Conservation Plan is one example of a government guideline supporting caribou sustainability. These strategies, which are built into our forest management plans, focus on providing habitat for caribou across the landscape on a long-term basis, and minimizing disturbances to caribou populations by using the following guidelines:

  • The development of road management strategies in each forest management plan identifies the location of roads, building techniques and closing procedures with caribou conservation in mind.
  • Areas that are important to caribou, such as caribou calving lakes, are prioritized for protection.
  • Conifer regeneration, which will result in suitable caribou habitat in the future, is prioritized in accordance with habitat protection decisions.
  • Harvest operations across the landscape are scheduled over time, in order to minimize overall disturbance levels for caribou populations.

The 150-Year Plan
Perhaps the most widespread approach to harvesting, is known as a “dynamic caribou habitat scheduling,” where areas in which an optimal harvesting sequence can be carried out over a span of 100 to 150 years are identified, so that suitable caribou habitat is constantly maintained in a caribou population range. By applying this technique, large areas of suitable habitat are continuously maintained for caribou across the landscape. These caribou “deferrals” move over in the region where and when previously harvested areas have acquired the desirable caribou habitat attributes. It is only when the caribou have other areas in which to safely move, that those previously deferred areas can be harvested. This approach concentrates harvest operations in defined areas, in order to minimize disturbance levels at any given time for caribou populations across the broader range of the species.

Looking Forward
Resolute has clearly expressed its commitment to sustaining woodland caribou populations with a combination of sustainable forest management practices, conservation of caribou habitat and the application of dynamic habitat scheduling in harvested areas to minimize disturbance and maintain sufficient caribou habitat across the landscape. Our company will continue to prioritize the conservation of this noble creature and national symbol well into the future, while also seeking additional partners and innovative approaches to further benefit woodland caribou populations across Canada.

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At Resolute Forest Products we want to have an open and honest discussion about the Canadian boreal forest and sustainable forest management. We welcome the opportunity to answer any questions you have. We created this page to field your questions, provide our responses, and have that discussion.

We also posted frequently asked questions with answers below. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, then we invite you to ask your question at the bottom of the page and we’ll do our best to respond quickly.

1) What is the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement?

Signed in 2010, the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement (CBFA) is the world’s largest conservation agreement, originally bringing together 21 member companies of the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) and nine environmental organizations to achieve the joint goal of ensuring the sustainability of the Canadian boreal forest for generations to come.

Resolute helped found the CBFA because of our commitment to sustainable forest management.

Read more about the CBFA and our involvement here.

2) How do you care for the Canadian boreal forest?

Resolute Forest Products practices forest stewardship to ensure the sustainability of the natural resources in our care. Stewardship means choosing carefully where to harvest, adopting nature’s methods, and ensuring regeneration. We take a multi-pronged approach to forest stewardship.

First, we develop comprehensive plans with regards to where we harvest. In Canada, we work on public lands, and only a portion of the boreal is open to harvesting. The boreal forest is one of the world’s most carefully managed forests, and we make sure to comply with all of the stringent regulations that govern it.

This involves:

  • Picking the right spot: Drawing on hundreds of maps, comprehensive wildlife surveys and decades of data, we block off areas where harvesting might conflict with traditional activities of First Nations (Native Canadians), consider the impact on wildlife habitat and take into account the area’s topographical features (for example, proximity to a river).
  • Mimicking nature’s method: We emulate natural disturbances in order to optimize forest regeneration.
  • Harvesting only certain trees: In the boreal, Resolute primarily works with softwood species such as black spruce, white spruce, jack pine and balsam fir. We also work with some hardwood species such as white birch and poplar. All these species require little to no help to regenerate quickly and abundantly. One exception is jack pine, which requires high temperatures (such as in the case of a forest fire) for its cones to release seeds.

Learn more about our forest management practices.

3) What have you done to protect caribou?

First, Resolute has supported proposals to set aside additional territory to safeguard caribou, specifically:

  • In Northeastern Ontario, an area in which Resolute receives 57 percent of the wood allocation, the Company, along with CBFA partners, supports a proposal for an additional caribou conservation area covering almost 3,223 square miles (835,000 hectares).
  • In Northwestern Ontario, Resolute has proposed setting aside an additional 787 square miles (204,000 hectares) of forest.
  • In Quebec, Resolute proposed an additional 2,671 square miles (692,000 hectares).

In addition to setting aside land, within the caribou range where harvesting is permitted, numerous techniques, best practices and guidelines are used to ensure prompt renewal of the forest, to emulate patterns of natural disturbance, and to ensure minimal disruption to wildlife, and especially the unique needs of caribou. These techniques govern:

  • The location of roads and how they are built
  • Distances between bodies of water and roads
  • Distances between bodies of water and the blocks designated for harvesting wood
  • Methodology for building bridges and tunnels to ensure minimum disruption

Learn more about how Resolute safeguards caribou.

 Care to discuss the issues? We want to hear from you.

Resolute Forest Products created Boreal Forest Facts to give everyone a place to discuss the sustainable management of our natural resources. We drafted the following rules to foster and protect open, honest, and respectful dialogue.

Rules on Commenting

Be civil and respectful: We reserve the right to delete posts that contain offensive or hurtful language and will not tolerate personal insults.

Check your facts: We reserve the right to correct incorrect statements or information taken out of context.

Stay on topic: We reserve the right to delete off-topic posts and unrelated links.

Don’t advertise: All spam and ads will be deleted.

Post your own thoughts: We reserve the right to delete posts that are in violation of another person’s intellectual property or copyright.

Don’t imitate other people: We reserve the right to remove content attempting to impersonate someone else including, but not limited to customers, clients, Resolute employees or other community members.

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Boreal Forest

Canada’s boreal region covers almost 60 percent of the country’s land area, essentially spanning from the Atlantic to the Pacific. At 2,000,000 mi², (over 5,740,000 km²), it is one of the largest and most complex ecosystems on the planet.

The boreal forest is fantastically diverse and complex. An ecosystem of lakes and wetlands moderates the climate, produces oxygen and purifies the water supply for its inhabitants. Much of the world’s freshwater is in the boreal’s lakes, rivers and streams. More than 208 billion tons of carbon are stored in the boreal’s trees, soils, water and peat, meaning that the forest has a significant impact on the planet’s ability to regulate the levels of carbon in the atmosphere.

According to Natural Resources Canada, “Canada’s boreal forest is often portrayed as one vast tract of ancient, pristine wilderness but this isn’t the case. Although the boreal region itself is ancient, the boreal forest is made up mostly of trees that are relatively young compared with many that grow in more temperate climates. It is regularly affected by forest fires, insects and other natural disturbances, but continually renews itself through these natural disturbances.”

Canadian Boreal Species

  • The Canadian boreal is home to a rich variety of tree species including Balsam Fir, White Birch, Poplar, Black and White Spruce, Jack Pine, Red Pine and Eastern White Cedar.
  • The region is home to more than just millions of acres of trees and wetlands — thousands of species of animals, birds, plants and insects thrive in its habitat.
  • Millions of land birds call the boreal region home, either permanently or as seasonal migrants. Among other species, the boreal is home to owls, hummingbirds, woodpeckers, vultures, hawks, kingfishers and songbirds.
  • Large mammal species in the Canadian boreal include caribou, deer, moose, wolves, and black bears.
  • Countless smaller mammals also call the boreal home, including foxes, lynx, raccoons, porcupines, hares, beavers, ermines, muskrats, pine marten, squirrels and bats.
  • Then there are the boreal’s insects, which include beetles, dragonflies, grasshoppers, bees, ants and—if you’ve had the chance to see them in person – spectacular butterflies.

Sustaining Whole Communities: Economic Impact of the Boreal

  • The forest products industry has been an important part of the Canadian economy for generations, and Aboriginal communities have relied on the boreal for millennia.
  • The forest products industry has a unique responsibility to understand and protect the forest and to study how best to ensure its viability as a source for natural, economic and social development.
  • The forest products industry has an outsized impact on the livelihoods and wellbeing of many Canadian communities. More than 600 Canadian communities rely on forestry. Half of those depend on forestry for at least 50% of household income, and about 160 of those communities are solely reliant on forestry.
  • 70% of Aboriginal communities in Canada are located in forested regions.
  • There are about 17,000 First Nations people working in Canada’s forest products sector and the sector’s activities involve more than 1,400 Aboriginal businesses.
  • Canada’s forest products industry is a $67 billion dollar (CAD) a year industry.
  • Canada’s forest products industry provides 230,000 direct jobs and almost 1 million indirect jobs across the country.
  • Our industry pays wages that are, on average, 16 percent above the national average, which helps sustain the economic health of hundreds of villages, towns and cities.
  • The products we produce are an important link between the United States and Canada, as the U.S. is by far the largest importer of Canadian forest products – used to produce products like newspapers, magazines, books, printing and writing papers, tissues and building materials.

The boreal forest is one of the great wonders of the natural world. It spans much of the Northern Hemisphere, from North America and Asia to parts of Europe, and is considered public land. The forest is home to unique plants, animals and human cultures that have coexisted for thousands of years. Those of us who live and work in Canada’s boreal region consider it a critical part of our culture, economy and collective future.

 

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Boreal Forest

Resolute is a responsible forest manager, operating along with other Canadian forest products companies in a highly regulated environment.

Forest Certification 

Forest certification and fiber tracking help to ensure the sustainability of our fiber supply and other forest values, including biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services.

Here are some of the highlights of our work in responsible forest management and wood fiber sourcing:

  • 100% of the woodlands we manage are third-party certified to internationally recognized certification standards.
  • 100% of Resolute’s manufacturing facilities have a CoC tracking system compliant with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative® (SFI®), the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) or the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®), all of which require that 100% of the fiber processed meets minimum due diligence requirements related to risks of illegal logging and other important sustainability issues.1
    • 93% of the wood supply for sawmills and 52% of virgin wood fiber inputs for pulp and paper mills are certified to internationally recognized standards.

For details on Resolute’s forest management certification, see here.

Forest Management Planning

In Ontario, Canada, as required by the laws and regulations of the province, Resolute prepares 20- year forest management plans that are updated every five years in collaboration with government and other stakeholders. Public consultation is part of the planning process and critical for the development of collaborative forest management strategies, which ensure that social needs are satisfied and values are protected.

Here’s a closer look at how Resolute plans forestry operations.

First, we develop comprehensive plans with regards to where we harvest. In Canada, we work on public lands, and only a small portion of the boreal is open to harvesting. The boreal forest is one of the world’s most carefully managed forests, and we make sure to comply with all of the stringent regulations that govern it.

This involves:

    • Picking the right spot: Drawing on hundreds of maps, comprehensive wildlife surveys and decades of data, we block off areas where harvesting might conflict with traditional activities of First Nations (Native Canadians), consider the impact on wildlife habitat and take into account the area’s topographical features (for example, proximity to a river).
    • Mimicking nature’s method: We emulate natural disturbances in order to optimize forest regeneration.
    • Harvesting only certain trees: In the boreal, Resolute primarily works with softwood species such as black spruce, white spruce, jack pine and balsam fir. We also work with some hardwood species such as white birch and poplar. All these species require little to no help to regenerate quickly and abundantly. One exception is jack pine, which requires high temperatures (such as in the case of a forest fire) for its cones to release seeds.

Reforestation work begins soon after a harvest. To learn more about forest regeneration, click here.

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An abundance of natural regeneration often results in the necessity to perform a “spacing” operation at age 10 to 15.

Returning regularly to ensure regeneration

Over several years following a harvest, we return regularly to the area to ensure that regeneration is progressing well, and to perform corrective measures if needed.

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Canadian Forestry Industry

The boreal forest has fed, clothed and housed humans for thousands of years. Today, it continues to be a source for people’s livelihood through direct employment – in harvesting and regenerating forests, and in manufacturing operations – and indirect employment; the grocery stores, schools, hospitals and thousands of other businesses and organizations that depend upon boreal communities.

Boreal Forest Economic Facts

  • More than 233,800 Canadians are directly employed in forestry jobs, and more than 600,000 Canadians rely on the industry for their livelihoods.
  • The forestry sector’s contribution to Canada’s GDP was $24 billion dollars CDN in 2012, or nearly 2 percent of the entire Canadian GDP (and 12 percent of Canada’s manufacturing GDP).
  • Over 800 First Nations communities are located in Canada’s boreal region, and an estimated 17,000 First Nations people in Canada make their living in the forest products industry.
  • The average wage of a forest products industry employee is $52,673, or 16 percent above the national Canadian average. The Canadian forest products industry pays roughly $9 billion in wages annually.
  • The industry is a vital contributor to trade between Canada and the United States — the U.S. alone counts for 65 percent of Canada’s wood and paper product exports for use in a range of products, from printing paper to building materials to packaging to labels and advertising.

Preserving these communities and their way of life is a major reason why the industry has invested so heavily in science-based conservation of forests to ensure environmental, social and economic sustainability.

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Boreal Sustainable Paper

The forest products industry has dramatically improved its sustainability and forest conservation performance in the past few decades, from reducing its carbon footprint to putting sustainable forest management practices in place. Resolute Forest Products adheres to some of the most rigorous fiber sourcing standards in the world, and our customers can rest easy knowing that the products they use come from responsibly managed forests.

Sustainable Forestry Measures

  • 100 percent of the woodlands we manage have been certified to one or more internationally-recognized sustainable forest management standards.
  • All of our mills in Canada and the U.S. have fiber-tracking systems in place that allow us to identify the source of the fiber or wood used. Most of these tracking systems are third-party certified according to one or more of these internationally recognized chain of custody standards: Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®), Sustainable Forestry Initiative® (SFI®) and Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC).
  • We prepare or contribute to the development of 20- or 25-year forest management plans that are revised every five years. Public participation is a critical part of the process, and we encourage First Nations and local communities to participate in the planning process.
  • Regeneration is an essential part of sustainable forest management. As a responsible forest manager, Resolute seeks to respect the natural growth cycle of trees while ensuring biodiversity. In Canada, fiber used in our products is sourced primarily from public land, located mainly in the boreal forest. By law, these woodlands must be promptly regenerated.

Boreal Forest Sustainability Goals

The sustainable forest management systems we use include provisions such as:

  • Respect for the rights of First Nations peoples
  • Development of comprehensive forest management plans
  • Regulation of harvest rates
  • Prompt and successful regeneration
  • Protection for biodiversity
  • Limits on activities near bodies of water in order to preserve water quality
  • Regular, science-based monitoring and assessment to ensure standards are met

How We Comply with Regulations

  • All of our operations are preceded by extensive planning and surveying — every single time. This careful planning is necessary for dealing with varying forest characteristics, adhering to regulations, and meeting the expectations of numerous stakeholders, as well as for maintaining our certifications. This planning ensures the long-term viability of forests.
  • Our foresters are experts in sustainable forest management and are deeply knowledgeable about the many detailed criteria involved in certification.
  • A “chain of custody” tracking system allows us to keep track of all the fiber that enters our facilities, whether it is sourced internally or externally. This allows us to confirm to our customers that our entire fiber supply meets rigorous standards.
  • Our sustainable forest management practices are verified by independent parties on a regular basis. Their guidance helps our Company further improve how we manage forests and monitor our fiber supply.

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United Nations’ 2014 Theme is “Celebrating Forests for Sustainable Development”

MONTREAL, CANADA, March 21, 2014 – Resolute Forest Products Inc. (NYSE: RFP) (TSX: RFP) today launched the Boreal Forest Facts website (www.BorealForestFacts.com) to coincide with the United Nations’ 2014 International Day of Forests, providing a new digital resource highlighting the company’s ongoing efforts to promote sustainable forest management in one of the world’s most vibrant ecosystems.

”Canadians have much to be proud of when it comes to the sustainable management of our forests,” said Richard Garneau, president and chief executive officer. “This site will offer a wealth of information about the boreal, the forest products industry, and the future of this renewable resource upon which so many of us depend.”

Resolute recognizes the importance of sustainable forestry practices. In fact, our business depends on a vibrant, sustainable boreal forest. Canada stands as a global leader in sustainable forest management, and in fact, a study by Yale University identified Canada’s forestry laws and regulations as among the most stringent in the world. Less than a quarter of one percent of the boreal is harvested each year, with five times that amount affected annually by natural disturbances such as fire, disease and insects. Well over 40% of the boreal is wholly out of bounds for the forest products industry in both Ontario and Quebec. Of the area available for harvesting, additional portions (38% in Quebec, and 34% in Ontario) have been set aside for conservation or other purposes.

These facts and many more can be found on Boreal Forest Facts. Other featured topics include Forest Stewardship; Safeguarding Caribou; First Nations; and Why Sustainability Makes Business Sense.

For more information, visit www.BorealForestFacts.com.

About Resolute Forest Products

Resolute Forest Products is a global leader in the forest products industry with a diverse range of products, including newsprint, specialty papers, market pulp and wood products. The company owns or operates over 40 pulp and paper mills and wood products facilities in the United States, Canada and South Korea, and power generation assets in Canada. Marketing its products in close to 90 countries, Resolute has third-party certified 100% of its managed woodlands to at least one of three internationally-recognized sustainable forest management standards. The shares of Resolute Forest Products trade under the stock symbol RFP on both the New York Stock Exchange and the Toronto Stock Exchange.

Resolute and other member companies of the Forest Products Association of Canada, as well as a number of environmental organizations, are partners in the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement. The group works to identify solutions to conservation issues that meet the goal of balancing equally the three pillars of sustainability linked to human activities: environmental, social and economic. Resolute is also a member of the World Wildlife Fund’s Climate Savers program, in which businesses establish ambitious targets to voluntarily reduce greenhouse gas emissions and work aggressively toward achieving them.

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Chief Georjann Morriseau is the elected Chief of Fort Williams First Nation near Thunder Bay, Ontario, located in the heart of the boreal region. Over 800 First Nations communities are scattered throughout Canada’s boreal region, and an estimated 17,000 First Nations people in Canada make their living in the forest products industry.
Chief Morriseau discusses our shared interest in ensuring that the forests we rely on continue to provide for the environmental, social, cultural and economic needs of future generations. Resolute Forest Products recognizes and respects the cultural and social significance of the land, water and forests of Canada to its First Nations peoples. We also recognize these resources are critical to their prosperity and economic sustainability.

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High carbon stock forests around the world have an important part to play in the capture, storage and release of carbon in the fight against global warming.

When people talk about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, one of the most maligned gases is carbon dioxide. Excess carbon in the atmosphere is not good, but carbon is one of the essential gases that make life on earth possible. Forests both store and release significant amounts of carbon as part of a natural cycle. And good forest management not only reduces a forest’s potential as a carbon source, it can also increase the effect of its carbon storage capacity.

VIDEOS

Resolute Forest Products CBFAvideo

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As a Canadian-based company with a long heritage in the boreal forest, we embrace our responsibility to preserve and renew the natural resources in...